Radio’s Worst Year In Over A Half Century

Last month Andrew Winistorfer of Prefix Mag reported that Sirius XM had serious troubles to take care of in this new media world. Its stock prices were at $0.16 a share.

In addition, it was recently reported that terrestrial radio is having its worst year… in decades.

Yes – we’re in a recession of sorts, but terrestrial radio is definitely feeling the pinch, too – not just Satellite.

Meanwhile, internet entertainment and business models are booming. Indie Rockers “The Sick Puppies” recently made an appearance in Youtube Live, which was seen by millions, and their successful Free Hugs Campaign has become an internet meme. In addition, Metallica and many indie musicians have recently been using New Media in order to grow their brand and tap into the movement.

In addition, we recently we learned how Satellite Radio and XM have a serious customer complaint about their merger. And all of this is happening at a time of financial crisis. So now as more independent music and release their own content, use Creative Commons, and go to the internet for information and services, things like terrestrial radio and Satellite are being taken over by RSS Feeds and Internet Podcasts/Streams. Things like Pandora are using widgets and new media in order to grow, as their seeing. Whereas others who are not in the internet scene are seeing decline. The demographic and formats are changing, which explains radio’s decline – even with the radio merger of other businesses.

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  • http://whatisnoise.com David Fisher

    For a while I had hoped that satellite radio would really take off, but then they seemed to make many of the stumbles that traditional radio did.

    Part of the problem I think comes down to the assumption that people want radio to begin with. The reasons that we had radio in the past were as a communication medium, and to transmit music that otherwise the person might not have immediate access to. Neither of those things are needed today. Asides from the fact that you can absorb the news on the radio passively while driving, there’s little advantage to it.

    I can honestly see radio, and perhaps traditional cable/satellite TV each going the way of the telegram in the next 10-15 years, and maybe sooner to some degree. I now get all my “tv” from iTunes, Hulu and Netflix. Haven’t subscribed to cable in years, and I’m perfectly happy. I don’t know the last time I owned a traditional radio, but I know my mom does love the XM I got her a few years back.

  • http://whatisnoise.com David Fisher

    For a while I had hoped that satellite radio would really take off, but then they seemed to make many of the stumbles that traditional radio did.

    Part of the problem I think comes down to the assumption that people want radio to begin with. The reasons that we had radio in the past were as a communication medium, and to transmit music that otherwise the person might not have immediate access to. Neither of those things are needed today. Asides from the fact that you can absorb the news on the radio passively while driving, there’s little advantage to it.

    I can honestly see radio, and perhaps traditional cable/satellite TV each going the way of the telegram in the next 10-15 years, and maybe sooner to some degree. I now get all my “tv” from iTunes, Hulu and Netflix. Haven’t subscribed to cable in years, and I’m perfectly happy. I don’t know the last time I owned a traditional radio, but I know my mom does love the XM I got her a few years back.

  • http://whatisnoise.com David Fisher

    For a while I had hoped that satellite radio would really take off, but then they seemed to make many of the stumbles that traditional radio did.

    Part of the problem I think comes down to the assumption that people want radio to begin with. The reasons that we had radio in the past were as a communication medium, and to transmit music that otherwise the person might not have immediate access to. Neither of those things are needed today. Asides from the fact that you can absorb the news on the radio passively while driving, there’s little advantage to it.

    I can honestly see radio, and perhaps traditional cable/satellite TV each going the way of the telegram in the next 10-15 years, and maybe sooner to some degree. I now get all my “tv” from iTunes, Hulu and Netflix. Haven’t subscribed to cable in years, and I’m perfectly happy. I don’t know the last time I owned a traditional radio, but I know my mom does love the XM I got her a few years back.