Unisons Explained Part 2

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  • Avichaimyers

    just watched you video on unisons, but i still dont understand something
    Although its the same note is there a particular way it is represented on the score so that you would know on which string to play the note
    for example if it says to play the high E do i play it on the open 1st string or do i play the 5th fret of the B string?
    and where can i apply this piece of knowledge, i know i can play the same riff in a different place on the fret board (sometimes allowing for more comfort) but is it specifically applied to something else other then soloing?

    • http://www.fororchestra.com WaltRibeiro

      there is no way to know which strings its to be performed. Sometimes you see above the clef “Low E string——–| ” but that’s not always the case. Also, Unisons are only unique to string players. Flutes and Trombones don’t have unisons. Music is a universal language, so it’s usually up to the performer where he/she performs the notes. That said, each string has its own sound (as I’m sure you know). So where you would apply it is 1.) ease of physical performance (as you mentioned) 2.) timbre (the sound that is created from playign a specific string). Also keep in mind, that when you’re soloing, some chords can only be played within certain spots on the guitar, so unisons are great to memorize and “see” the common notes on the fretboard

      • Avichaimyers

        thank you very much :)

      • Avichaimyers

        thank you very much :)

  • Avichaimyers

    just watched you video on unisons, but i still dont understand something
    Although its the same note is there a particular way it is represented on the score so that you would know on which string to play the note
    for example if it says to play the high E do i play it on the open 1st string or do i play the 5th fret of the B string?
    and where can i apply this piece of knowledge, i know i can play the same riff in a different place on the fret board (sometimes allowing for more comfort) but is it specifically applied to something else other then soloing?

    • http://www.fororchestra.com WaltRibeiro

      there is no way to know which strings its to be performed. Sometimes you see above the clef “Low E string——–| ” but that’s not always the case. Also, Unisons are only unique to string players. Flutes and Trombones don’t have unisons. Music is a universal language, so it’s usually up to the performer where he/she performs the notes. That said, each string has its own sound (as I’m sure you know). So where you would apply it is 1.) ease of physical performance (as you mentioned) 2.) timbre (the sound that is created from playign a specific string). Also keep in mind, that when you’re soloing, some chords can only be played within certain spots on the guitar, so unisons are great to memorize and “see” the common notes on the fretboard

    • http://www.fororchestra.com WaltRibeiro

      there is no way to know which strings its to be performed. Sometimes you see above the clef “Low E string——–| ” but that’s not always the case. Also, Unisons are only unique to string players. Flutes and Trombones don’t have unisons. Music is a universal language, so it’s usually up to the performer where he/she performs the notes. That said, each string has its own sound (as I’m sure you know). So where you would apply it is 1.) ease of physical performance (as you mentioned) 2.) timbre (the sound that is created from playign a specific string). Also keep in mind, that when you’re soloing, some chords can only be played within certain spots on the guitar, so unisons are great to memorize and “see” the common notes on the fretboard

      • Avichaimyers

        thank you very much :)

      • Avichaimyers

        thank you very much :)

  • Avichaimyers

    just watched you video on unisons, but i still dont understand something
    Although its the same note is there a particular way it is represented on the score so that you would know on which string to play the note
    for example if it says to play the high E do i play it on the open 1st string or do i play the 5th fret of the B string?
    and where can i apply this piece of knowledge, i know i can play the same riff in a different place on the fret board (sometimes allowing for more comfort) but is it specifically applied to something else other then soloing?