• http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/ Journeyman

    i didn’t watch the video but the difference between them is nothing they sound the same there sharps when you strum down and flats when strum up

  • http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/ Journeyman

    i didn’t watch the video but the difference between them is nothing they sound the same there sharps when you strum down and flats when strum up

  • http://www.twitter.com/waltribeiro Walt Ribeiro

    That’s completely incorrect. You should watch the video.

  • http://www.twitter.com/waltribeiro Walt Ribeiro

    That’s completely incorrect. You should watch the video.

  • jr

    question – how is the F# the enharmonic of an E natural if F is a whole step from an E? or did I miss a lesson?
    this was really helpful for me though.

  • jr

    question – how is the F# the enharmonic of an E natural if F is a whole step from an E? or did I miss a lesson?
    this was really helpful for me though.

  • http://www.waltribeiro.net Walt

    The enharmonic of F# is Gb

    The enharmonic of E natural is Fb

    :)

  • http://www.waltribeiro.net Walt

    The enharmonic of F# is Gb

    The enharmonic of E natural is Fb

    :)

  • jr

    ok, i just realized i messed up my question, but here’s a clearer one (I hope). Which is the E# or Fb key if there’s no half step (black) key in between? or would it be playable on another instrument (e.g. violin)?

  • jr

    ok, i just realized i messed up my question, but here’s a clearer one (I hope). Which is the E# or Fb key if there’s no half step (black) key in between? or would it be playable on another instrument (e.g. violin)?

  • http://www.waltribeiro.net Walt

    The E# is the same as saying F.

    The Fb is the same as saying E natural.

    There’s no black key on the piano for those notes because there’s no note between them. When something is sharpened or flattened it’s just another way of saying “Go up a Half Step.”

    So an F Double Sharp (F ##) is the same as saying G natural.

    And now you know.. because I care :)

  • http://www.waltribeiro.net Walt

    The E# is the same as saying F.

    The Fb is the same as saying E natural.

    There’s no black key on the piano for those notes because there’s no note between them. When something is sharpened or flattened it’s just another way of saying “Go up a Half Step.”

    So an F Double Sharp (F ##) is the same as saying G natural.

    And now you know.. because I care :)

  • jr

    Got it! Thanks! And now I feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  • jr

    Got it! Thanks! And now I feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  • Bob Hoskins

    Journeyman is actually completely correct. There is no difference between sharps and flats, they are the EXACT same pitch.

  • Bob Hoskins

    Journeyman is actually completely correct. There is no difference between sharps and flats, they are the EXACT same pitch.

  • rivolis

    Hello.
    I have a question:
    -Between B,C and E,F we have whole steps,right?
    -If that is true how F=E# works?Since between them we have a whole step and the # rises the note for a half step.
    Did i understand something wrong?

  • rivolis

    Hello.
    I have a question:
    -Between B,C and E,F we have whole steps,right?
    -If that is true how F=E# works?Since between them we have a whole step and the # rises the note for a half step.
    Did i understand something wrong?

  • Creeper

    why are there double flats? cant the natural equivalent be written?

    • http://www.fororchestra.com WaltRibeiro

      i agree, kind of pointless. It’s mainly an academic thing so that you’re ‘technically’ correct and showing that a note form the scale is moving up or down twice, rather than to put the natural note in it’s place. either way, it doesn’t make much difference, but I use them because I like to think “E being flattened twice” is not the same as “D”. Makes no difference tho.