Comments

  1. i didn’t watch the video but the difference between them is nothing they sound the same there sharps when you strum down and flats when strum up

  2. i didn’t watch the video but the difference between them is nothing they sound the same there sharps when you strum down and flats when strum up

  3. That’s completely incorrect. You should watch the video.

  4. That’s completely incorrect. You should watch the video.

  5. jr

    question – how is the F# the enharmonic of an E natural if F is a whole step from an E? or did I miss a lesson?
    this was really helpful for me though.

  6. jr

    question – how is the F# the enharmonic of an E natural if F is a whole step from an E? or did I miss a lesson?
    this was really helpful for me though.

  7. The enharmonic of F# is Gb

    The enharmonic of E natural is Fb

    :)

  8. The enharmonic of F# is Gb

    The enharmonic of E natural is Fb

    :)

  9. jr

    ok, i just realized i messed up my question, but here’s a clearer one (I hope). Which is the E# or Fb key if there’s no half step (black) key in between? or would it be playable on another instrument (e.g. violin)?

  10. jr

    ok, i just realized i messed up my question, but here’s a clearer one (I hope). Which is the E# or Fb key if there’s no half step (black) key in between? or would it be playable on another instrument (e.g. violin)?

  11. The E# is the same as saying F.

    The Fb is the same as saying E natural.

    There’s no black key on the piano for those notes because there’s no note between them. When something is sharpened or flattened it’s just another way of saying “Go up a Half Step.”

    So an F Double Sharp (F ##) is the same as saying G natural.

    And now you know.. because I care :)

  12. The E# is the same as saying F.

    The Fb is the same as saying E natural.

    There’s no black key on the piano for those notes because there’s no note between them. When something is sharpened or flattened it’s just another way of saying “Go up a Half Step.”

    So an F Double Sharp (F ##) is the same as saying G natural.

    And now you know.. because I care :)

  13. jr

    Got it! Thanks! And now I feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  14. jr

    Got it! Thanks! And now I feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

  15. Bob Hoskins

    Journeyman is actually completely correct. There is no difference between sharps and flats, they are the EXACT same pitch.

  16. Bob Hoskins

    Journeyman is actually completely correct. There is no difference between sharps and flats, they are the EXACT same pitch.

  17. rivolis

    Hello.
    I have a question:
    -Between B,C and E,F we have whole steps,right?
    -If that is true how F=E# works?Since between them we have a whole step and the # rises the note for a half step.
    Did i understand something wrong?

  18. rivolis

    Hello.
    I have a question:
    -Between B,C and E,F we have whole steps,right?
    -If that is true how F=E# works?Since between them we have a whole step and the # rises the note for a half step.
    Did i understand something wrong?

  19. Creeper

    why are there double flats? cant the natural equivalent be written?

  20. i agree, kind of pointless. It’s mainly an academic thing so that you’re ‘technically’ correct and showing that a note form the scale is moving up or down twice, rather than to put the natural note in it’s place. either way, it doesn’t make much difference, but I use them because I like to think “E being flattened twice” is not the same as “D”. Makes no difference tho.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>